Cardiac / Pulmonary

Post MI Myocardial Infarction | CHF and Cardiomyopathy | Lung Disease | Cardiac Disease


Post MI Myocardial Infarction

Myocardial infarction (also known as heart attack) is responsible for significant cardiac destruction due to ischemia (lack of blood flow). This can lead to further or recurrent infarct and chronic angina. This problem is caused most commonly by coronary vessel disease which is very common in the United States and associated with significant morbidity.

Shoulder Problems and Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center

Cell therapy potentially offers an important solution for chronic ischemia. During cardiac ischemia, millions of myocytes are lost resulting in loss of contractile function. One of the great goals of regenerative medicine is to engineer methods of replacing these cells. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and now recently adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells appear to be playing an important role in this regeneration. There is also a growing body of data supporting the use of engineered biologics such as selected cell populations, organic scaffolds, and modified (differentiated or de-differentiated) stem cells to regenerate damaged myocardium. It is unknown whether the cost of engineered biologics over harvested stem cells is justified until long term studies are available. The results of clinical trials of the use of adult mesenchymal stem cells to treat cardiac disease have demonstrated safety and most have shown positive clinical results. Mesenchymal stem cells have been deployed intravenously, injected the myocardium, and placed in the coronary arteries and it is still unclear if one delivery method is clearly superior to another. It is also unclear which source of mesenchymal cells is optimal for cardiac regeneration but adipose derived cells appear to be highly effective in this area.

Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center Call to Action

Research has been ongoing around the world that exploits the anti-inflammatory and regenerative properties of adult stem cells to mitigate cardiac ischemia. Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center is investigating the effects of SVF (rich in mesenchymal stem cells and growth factors) on damaged myocardium. We use a protocol designed by our interventional cardiologist that includes intravenous deployment. The CSCTC deployment protocol is performed under local anesthesia and is all done as an outpatient at the time of SVF harvesting and procurement. The entire cellular surgical procedure takes approximately 3 hours.


CHF and Cardiomyopathy

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is responsible for many one million hospitalizations in the U.S. and is considered the main cause or contributor to 53,000 deaths each year in the United States. CHF is associated with cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy (deterioration in heart muscles) is commonly caused by coronary vessel disease but can also be due to infection and other causes. In this condition, the heart loses its ability to pump blood efficiently.

CHF and Cardiomyopathy and Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center

Cell therapy potentially offers an important solution for CHF and cardiomyopathy. During cardiac ischemia, millions of myocytes are lost resulting in loss of contractile function. One of the great goals of regenerative medicine is to engineer methods of replacing these cells. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and now recently adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells appear to be playing an important role in this regeneration. There is also a growing body of data supporting the use of engineered biologics such as selected cell populations, organic scaffolds, and modified (differentiated or de-differentiated) stem cells to regenerate damaged myocardium. It is unknown whether the cost of engineered biologics over harvested stem cells is justified until long term studies are available. The results of clinical trials of the use of adult mesenchymal stem cells to treat cardiac disease have demonstrated safety and most have shown positive clinical results. Mesenchymal stem cells have been deployed intravenously, injected the myocardium, and placed in the coronary arteries and it is still unclear if one delivery method is clearly superior to another. It is also unclear which source of mesenchymal cells is optimal for cardiac regeneration but adipose derived cells appear to be highly effective in this area.

Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center Call to Action

Research has been ongoing around the world that exploits the anti-inflammatory and regenerative properties of adult stem cells to mitigate heart failure. Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center is investigating the effects of SVF (rich in mesenchymal stem cells and growth factors) on CHF. We use a protocol designed by our interventional cardiologist that includes intravenous deployment. The CSCTC deployment protocol is performed under local anesthesia and is all done as an outpatient at the time of SVF harvesting and procurement. The entire cellular surgical procedure takes approximately 3 hours.


Lung Disease

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases. It makes it difficult to breathe. There are two main forms of COPD: chronic bronchitis, which involves a long-term cough with mucus, and emphysema, which involves destruction of the lungs over time. Most people with COPD have a combination of both conditions. Smoking is the leading cause of COPD. Standard treatment includes the use of bronchodilator inhalers, steroids, and supplemental oxygen.

Chronic Obstructive Pulomany Disease (COPD) and Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center

Research has been ongoing around the world that exploits the anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties of adult stem cells to control the loss of elasticity and damage in the small airways seen in patients with COPD. Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center is investigating the effects of SVF (rich in mesenchymal stem cells and growth factors) on airway healing. We use a protocol that includes a combination of intravenous and nebulized SVF delivery. The CSCTC deployment protocol performed under local anesthesia is all done as an outpatient at the time of SVF harvesting and procurement. The entire cellular surgical procedure takes approximately 3 hours.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Call to Action

We care about our Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients at Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center and the Cell Surgical Network and take pride in the time we provide to our patients to deploy the best protocols to help our patients achieve their goals. By filling out CSCTC Confidential Candidate Application, we will answer the questions and concerns you may have about Silicon Valley Stem Cell Treatment Center and Cell Surgical Network protocols for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Our Cell Surgical Network has Treatment Centers in several states, checkout our Physician Network to find the closest Treatment Center. Our Physician Network Map.


Cardiac Disease

Regen Med. 2011 Nov;6(6 Suppl):17-23.

Stem cell therapy in cardiology.

Choudry FA, Mathur A.

Source
London Chest Hospital, Bonner Road, London E2 9JX, UK.

Abstract

Cell therapy provides one of the most important solutions to the unmet need for new treatments in cardiovascular disease. This area of research has undergone a rapid translation into humans, with the bone marrow mononuclear cell predominating as the cell type with most clinical data. Confidence in the use of this cell type has grown over the last year with the publication of the results of Phase II/III trials in the setting of acute and chronic ischemia confirming safety and biological activity. A large pan-European outcome study is now being planned, which will definitely address the therapeutic potential of this cell type with respect to mortality. Data for the use of selected populations of cells, bioengineered cells/scaffolds and the resident stem cell population continue to grow, with some of these approaches reported in Phase I clinical trials with promising results. There is still some way to go and these more complicated cell therapy products will need to undergo the same scrutiny that has been applied to the results of the bone marrow mononuclear cell trials to date. Ultimately, these engineered biologics will have to justify the costs involved in producing them by significantly improving on results obtained by using bone marrow mononuclear cells for cardiovascular repair. The continued success of this area of translational medicine relies on the ongoing partnership between clinicians and scientists, who have thus far demonstrated a determined and pragmatic approach to solving some of the complexities of moving from bench to bedside. The next 5-years will see this partnership reach fruition as the long-awaited results of outcome studies of cell therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease are published.